Employee Satisfaction and Theft: Testing Climate Perceptions as a Mediator

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Employee Satisfaction and Theft: Testing Climate Perceptions as a Mediator

ABSTRACT. Employee theft of both property and time is an expensive and pervasive problem for American organizations. One antecedent of theft behaviors is employee dis- satisfaction, but not all dissatisfied employees engage in withdrawal or theft behaviors. The authors tested a model of theft behavior by using an organization’s climate for theft as an explanatory mechanism. They found that dissatisfaction influenced employee theft behaviors through the intermediary influence of employees’ individual perceptions of the organization’s climate for theft. The authors encourage organizations to pay attention to such climate elements and take action to alter employee perceptions if they reflect permissive attitudes toward theft.

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Employee engagement, organisational performance and individual well-being: exploring the evidence, developing the theory

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Employee engagement, organisational performance and individual well-being: exploring the evidence, developing the theory

Introduction

Researchers within the mainstream human resource management (HRM) field have long been concerned with the question of how the management of people can lead to improved organisational performance outcomes (Huselid 1995). Indeed, the quest to understand and operationalise the HRM-performance link has come to be seen as the overriding purpose of strategic human resource management (SHRM; Delbridge and Keenoy 2010). It was therefore no doubt with some degree of despondency that researchers and practitioners alike read Guest’s (2011, p. 11) recent conclusion that ‘we are still in no position to assert with any confidence that good HRM has an impact on organisation performance’. The area remains beset with problems of theory, methodology and data (Boselie, Dietz and Boon 2005).

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